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The Drown Newsletter

Issue 1 March 1994

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THE FIRST ISSUE IS HERE!

Welcome to the first issue of The Drown Newsletter. You may have seen or been offered other newsletters and publications claiming to be the "official" Drown family publication, but we assure you, this one is genuine. Why? Because itís almost free (except for a little postage money) and it really is published by a Drown!

PURPOSE

We are starting this newsletter as a way for those interested family members and friends to share family history information on the Drown/Drowne/Drowns family. There are a surprising number of us collecting genealogical and historical information on this great American family and this newsletter will serve as a good way to share information, ask questions, solve problems, and get to know each other. We welcome your suggestions, your inputs and ideas for improving the newsletter.

Classified Ads

You may send in ads and queries to be published. Please keep them as short and precise as possible. If you do not want your name and address published here, you may direct that responses be directed to the newsletter and we will forward them on to you.

EDITORIAL

The Importance of Documentation

We all want accuracy in genealogical data. Much if the information we get our hands on may very well be accurate, but we cannot know with a comfortable certainty unless the person who provides the information also lists the source where it was obtained. Those who are familiar with the great volume of work done by Henry Russell Drowne know how great it would be if we knew where he got all the information. This becomes most critical when original records get lost, but we are saved when someone had recorded "birth date copied from town birth records" or "marriage date recorded in family bible in possession of ...".

When sharing information with others, always tell where it came from. If you do not know, say so. If you do not know exact dates, say, for example, "about 1860" or "before 1910".

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